How to have a heart attack

| May 13, 2015

When people go for a mid-morning cigarette or coffee break, they are probably not aware that this could be a very dangerous moment for them. Why do I say that?

According to a report published in 2004 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the most common time of day for heart-related medical incidents such as heart attacks and strokes is about 10 in the morning, largely because of the body’s internal clock functions.

The incidence of heartbeat fluctuations and other anomalies that can make a healthy person’s heart appear diseased and can trigger heart-related events peaks in the mid-morning. This was the findings of a study conducted by Harvard Medical School and Boston University, as revealed by PNAS.

According to one of the researcher, what people traditionally think of as a random or erratic signal has hidden features or patterns that repeat over time. He further stressed that while activities such as work and exercise have been believed to play a part in heart rate fluctuations, many heart irregularities occur regardless of what the person is doing. Nonetheless, he was not sure why there are changes across the 24-hour period for most of these disorders.

Besides the normal risk factors, what else can trigger heart attack? UTI is one of them. But, you may ask, what is UTI and how can UTI be related to heart attack?

UTI stands for urinary tract infections. People with severe, acute heart disease, called acute coronary syndrome, are 3 times more likely to have UTI than other heart patients, and the condition may be a trigger for a heart attack.

The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas released the results from a study of 100 patient admitted to the center with acute coronary syndrome. The same number of patients awaiting coronary bypass surgery served as a comparison control group. The investigations found that 27 of the acute syndrome patients had sub-clinical urinary infections, compared with 11 control patients.

By comparison, prevalence of urinary tract infections in the general population appears to be from 2 percent to 10 percent. Infection agents such as the ulcer bug Helicobacter pylori have long been suspected as triggers of acute coronary events.

Since a urine test is part of a routine admissions procedure, physicians should be alerted to the possibility of a urinary tract infection in people admitted with acute coronary syndrome, and to treat it promptly.

America’s Most Trusted Doctor Reveals … How to Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease – Without Drugs or Surgery. Read more about his confession at: http://www.howtopreventheartdisease.com/heart-disease-prevention-dr-robert-article.html


Category: Healthcare Basics

About the Author ()

Comments are closed.